Section Officers: If you would like to display your call for papers on this page, please submit it using our online form by August 31. Be sure to include deadline, contact information, and detailed submission instructions.

 

Section on Administrative Law

The Section on Administrative Law seeks two panelists for its program “Presidential Control of Administrative Agencies,” with a (non-exclusive) focus on President Trump’s interactions with the administrative state.

Submission guidelines: Submit abstracts or full papers (more complete projects will be given priority) to Louis Virelli by August 31.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Aging and the Law

Thanks to advances in health care, people are living longer. Longevity has legal consequences, and differing impacts for women, people of color, low-income people, and LGBT individuals. This panel will explore the intersection of the legal system and longevity, examining systems that are in place or should be in place to help people plan for living longer. Presenters may have the opportunity to publish their paper in the Journal of Health Law and Policy at Cleveland State University.

Submission guidelines: Please submit a 1 or 2 page proposal to Naomi Cahn by May 1, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Balance in Legal Education

The Section on Balance in Legal Education will select at least one additional panelist for their program “Building (Self) Compassion and Other Sources of Well-Being.” Each presenter will give an independent short presentation, followed by a moderated panelist and audience discussion.

Submission guidelines: Submit a 1 page proposal to Program Committee Co-Chair Jarrod Reich, by Friday, September 7, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Balance in Legal Education

The Section on Balance in Legal Education seeks presenters for its pedagogy program for new law teachers, “Building Bridges from Undergraduate Experience to Law School,” which will be structured as a moderated roundtable. Preference will be given to presenters who have never presented at an AALS meeting, but all submissions are welcome.

Submission guidelines: Submit a one-page proposal to Jarrod Reich by Friday, August 10.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Sections on Biolaw, National Security
Co-Sponsored by Section on National Security

The Section on Biolaw is pleased to announce a Call for Papers  for “Biosecurity Law: Keeping up with Biotechnology,” co-sponsored by the Section on National Security, to be held during the AALS 2019 Annual Meeting. The threat of a global pandemic, from emerging infectious diseases like Ebola and Zika, the lone bioterrorist or the nation-state bioweapons program, have all shaped the growing area of biosecurity law. Do the existing international legal frameworks still continue to be viable against biothreats? Is there a future for the Biological Weapons Convention? How have biological threats risen to a national security threat? What next? Papers from this panel will be published in the next volume of The Journal for Biosecurity, Biosafety and Biodefense Law.

Submission Guidelines: Papers should be 7,000-8,000 words in length in a law review style. Submit them electronically to Professor Victoria Sutton by August 15, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Sections on Business Associations
Co-Sponsored by Agency, Partnership, LLC’s and Unincorporated Associations

From venture capital preferred stock provisions, to shareholder involvement in approval procedures, to forum selection and arbitration, is the contract king in establishing the corporate governance contours of firms? The Section on Business Associations seeks up to two presenters for their program “Contractual Governance: the Role of Private Ordering.”

Submission Guidelines: Submit an abstract or draft of an unpublished paper to Anne Tucker on or before August 1, 2018. Remove the author’s name and identifying information from the submission but include the author’s name and contact information in the email.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Sections on Commercial & Related Consumer Law and Creditors’ and Debtors’ Rights

The Sections on Commercial & Related Consumer Law and Creditors’ and Debtors’ Rights are seeking panelists for their joint program “The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Past, Present, and Future.” This program will examine the tumultuous history of the CFPB, from its creation as part of DoddFrank to the legal fight over who currently leads the Bureau, and its future.

Submission Guidelines: Submit a comprehensive abstract or manuscript via google form before August 15, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Family and Juvenile Law

The Section on Family and Juvenile Law seeks presenters—particularly junior scholars—for their panel “Parents’ and Children’s Rights in a Post-Obergefell World,” cosponsored by the Sections on Children and the Law and Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Issues. This panel will focus on the interplay between parents’ and children’s relational rights, and how these have evolved to reflect demographic realities, new understandings of childhood and adolescent development, and the sea change in marriage jurisprudence.

Submission Guidelines: Send draft papers of at least 10,000 words to cynthia.godsoe@brooklaw.edu by August 10, 2018. Please use “AALS Call for Papers Submission” as the subject line of your email.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Family and Juvenile Law

The Section on Family and Juvenile Law will select up to three panelists for their program “Alternative Approaches to Teaching Family Law.” Teaching a basic or advanced family law course can be challenging with new changes in the law and increasing expectations for students to be “practice ready.” Organizers seek interactive teaching methods that engage students inside and outside of the classroom.

Submission guidelines: Submit your presentation to jdweaver@smu.edu by Friday June 1.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Sections on International Human Rights

The International Human Rights Section solicits papers and works-in-progress on any aspect of human rights law by faculty members who have never presented a human rights paper at AALS. Preference will be given to junior scholars.

Submission guidelines: Submissions should be sent to Peter Halewood by June 1, 2018. Instead of a full-length paper, please submit a concept note of 5-15 double-spaced pages that contains a summary of the key ideas. If you have already written a full-length paper, please send an excerpt of the paper with an explanatory introduction.


Sections on International Human Rights, Law and Social Sciences

The International Human Rights Section and the Law and Social Sciences Section solicit papers and works-in-progress on empirical approaches to human rights law, with a preference for papers on human rights indicators. There is a growing need for empirical approaches to the study of law.  With the changing role of the U.S. in the global arena, this is especially true in the field of international human rights. Because traditional qualitative case studies do not necessarily provide an effective means for comparison, there has been growing interest in the creation of “human rights indicators,” which indicators involve the translation of legal obligations into quantitative or qualitative metrics, which then allow countries to be compared with one another over time.  Indicators of civil and political rights and also economic and social rights can be powerful advocacy tools because of their potential to influence behavior—i.e. no country wants to be ranked last. This panel seeks to contribute to the growing debate over how human rights indicators can and should be used to identify human rights violations and to assess progress with treaty obligations over time.

Submission guidelines: Please submit a concept note of 5-15 double-spaced pages that contains a summary of the key ideas to Sharmila Murthy by June 1, 2018. If you have already written a full-length paper, please send an excerpt of the paper with an explanatory introduction.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Internet and Computer Law

The Section on Internet and Computer Law seeks one presenter for its program “The Internet of Bodies: Cyborgs and the Law,” exploring the legal issues surrounding Internet-connected devices that are increasingly being integrated into human bodies.

Submission guidelines: Papers should be submitted electronically to Christina Mulligan by Friday, August 10.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Jewish Law

The Section on Jewish Law welcomes papers for its program “The Evolution and Use of Judeo-Christian in American Law and Public Life.” The term is currently most likely deployed by cultural conservatives arguing in favor of traditional family structures and an enhanced public role for traditional religion. This panel will refine debates around current usage and examine where this usage came from.

Submission guidelines: Submit an extended abstract of about 2 pages to Chaim Saiman by August 15.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Law and Anthropology
Joint Program with Law and the Social Sciences

How does government corruption work, and what effects does it have? What constitutes corruption in any given society, and how do we recognize corruption’s inverse, legitimation? The Sections on Law and Anthropology and Law and the Social Sciences invite paper proposals for a joint panel on “Corruption and Legitimation.”

Submission guidelines: Send an abstract (around 500 words) outlining the paper that you’d like to present by May 1, 2018, to Anya Bernstein and David Kwok.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Law and Interpretation
Co-Sponsored with Legislation & Law of the Political Process

The Section Program “Corpus Linguistics: The Quest for Objective Interpretation” will use Judging Ordinary Meaning, recently published in the Yale Law Journal, as a focal point for the contention that linguistics – in particular, corpus analysis – can provide strong evidence of the “ordinary meaning” of statutory provisions by providing empirical confirmation of how statutory words are used in ordinary discourse. Three commentators, chosen from this call, will each have 15 minutes to provide their assessment of corpus linguistics for statutory interpretation.

Submission guidelines: Papers should be submitted electronically to Professor Jay Mootz by July 31, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Law and Sports

The Section on Law and Sports requests papers for their Annual Meeting 2019 program “The Dark Side of Sports: Crime, Corruption, and Cost,” cosponsored by the Section on Criminal Justice. Sports are a big business, and are as susceptible as any industry to criminal activity and corruption, imposing significant costs on the many constituencies who make up and support the game. This program examines what constitutes sports corruption and criminality that public policy and resources need to address.

Submission guidelines: Papers should not exceed 25,000 words (including footnotes) in Microsoft Word and should be emailed to Professor Jodi Balsam, Chair of the Section on Law and Sports, by July 1, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Legislation and Law of the Political Process

Statutory text has become the focal point for questions of statutory interpretation. Despite widespread agreement that text matters, there is less agreement about how statutory text helps determine statutory meaning. The Section welcomes papers that explore how textualist arguments and methods are developing in the 21st Century, including current trends and practices in the courts and theoretical justifications for, and objections, to textualist methods.

Submission guidelines: Submit extended abstracts (2-3 pages) to Evan Zoldan by July 31, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Leadership

The new AALS Section on Leadership will select one panelist for its session “Leadership in Times of Challenge,” which will focus on the need for law schools to better equip law students for the challenges they will face as leaders in an ever-increasingly complex and challenging world.

Submission guidelines: Submit papers to Professor Deborah L. Rhode by August 15, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Sections on Poverty Law and Children and the Law

The Sections on Poverty Law and Children and the Law seek panelists for their joint program “Bridging the Gap: Perspectives on Poverty and its Impact on Childhood,” exploring how children’s lives are impacted by poverty.

Submission guidelines: Submit papers to Sacha Coupet and Maryam Ahranjani by Wednesday, August 15.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Professional Responsibility

The Section on Professional Responsibility seeks papers for its program “The Ethics of Lawyers in Government,” a role which has recently been catapulted to the national stage. In such a climate, it is critical for legal academics to examine the role and ethical obligations of lawyers in government service.

Submission guidelines: Submit papers to Margaret Tarkington no later than September 1, with the subject line: PR Section Call for Papers.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Sections on Real Estate Transactions

2018 marks the 10th anniversary of the 2008 housing crisis and the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, which upended many decades of overt housing discrimination. Both events remind us of the significant role that housing has played in the American story—both for good and for bad. The section seeks related papers for its program “Access + Opportunity + Choice: Housing Capital, Equity, and Market Regulation in the Trump Era.”

Submission guidelines: Email submissions to Chris Odinet by Friday, August 3, 2018. Preference will be given to submissions that demonstrate novel scholarly insights that have been substantially developed. Untenured scholars in particular are encouraged to submit their work.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Sections on Remedies

The Section on Remedies invites paper proposals for their program called “Intellectual Property Remedies at the Supreme Court and Worldwide,” cosponsored by the Section on Intellectual Property. This panel will engage an integrated discussion among experts on provocative IP-Remedies topics including the legacy of eBay on injunctions, reasonable royalties, restitution and recovery of an infringer’s profits in light of the Restatement (Third) of Restitution and Unjust Enrichment.

Submission guidelines: Submit an abstract (and a draft paper if available) by June 1, 2018 to the Chair of the Remedies Section: alexandra.lahav@uconn.edu.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Issues

The Section on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Issues seeks panelists for their program “LGBTQ Rights, Poverty, and Public Policy,” addressing legal and policy issues concerning poverty in the LGBTQ community in light of a March 2018 report from The LGBTQ Poverty Initiative revealing that LGBTQ people disproportionately struggle with poverty.

Submission guidelines: Submit a 500-word abstract (and paper draft if available) and a CV to Prof. David Cruz by Tuesday, July 31 at 11:59 p.m. PDT.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Taxation
Co-Sponsored with Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation and Nonprofit & Philanthropy Law

The Section on Taxation welcomes unpublished papers from scholars with seven or fewer years of full-time teaching experience for its works-in-progress session “New Voices in Tax Policy and Public Finance.” Legal scholarship across a variety of methodological approaches is welcomed.

Submission guidelines: Submit papers to tax.section.cfp@gmail.com by 5 pm on Wednesday, August 8, 2018.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.


Section on Transactional Law and Skills

The Section on Transactional Law and Skills seeks papers for its program “Transactional Law and Finance: Challenges and Opportunities for Teaching and Research,” examining the role of finance in business transactions from various perspectives with the goal of inspiring more deliberate consideration of finance in law school teaching and legal scholarship.

Submission guidelines: Submit a 1 or 2-page proposal to Christina Sautter by August 31.

More details are available in the complete call for papers.