Section Calls for Papers - Annual Meeting

Section Officers: If you would like to display your call for papers on this page, please submit it using our online form by Friday, August 27, 2021. Be sure to include deadline, contact information, and detailed submission instructions.


Sections on Academic Support and Technology, Law, and Education

Description: The theme for the AALS 2022 Annual Meeting is “Freedom, Equality, and the Common Good.” We seek to explore these topics as they relate to the intersection of academic support and distance legal education. First, we hope to explore whether distance legal education (a.k.a. online teaching) serves the Common Good in legal education. In other words, does technology help or hurt legal education? Next, we plan to pivot to the question of Equality. Are all faculty equally expected to contribute to courses dealing with technology and are faculty compensated adequately (whether time and/or money) for their time in developing asynchronous content? Finally, the presentation will conclude with a discussion of Academic Freedom. Most notably, who owns the work?

Submission Information: Please submit your proposal to the Academic Support Programming Chair, Kirsha Trychta, at kwtrychta@mail.wvu.edu by June 30, 2021. The Committee anticipates notifying those who have been selected to present on/around July 14, 2021. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of the Programming Co-Chairs: Natalie Rodriguez at narodriguez@swlaw.edu, Kirsha Weyandt Trychta at kwtrychta@mail.wvu.edu, or Michelle Zakarin at mzakarin@tourolaw.edu.

More information on submission guidelines can be found here.


Section on Agricultural and Food Law

Co-Sponsored by the Sections on Animal Law and State and Local Government

Description: The AALS Section on Agricultural and Food Law is seeking speakers for its session-Food Law in Times of Crisis: From Climate Change to COVID-at the 2022 AALS Virtual Annual Meeting. The session will focus on law and policy measures in the context of crises (natural or human-made) and the food system. The topic is intended to be broad in focus. Potential topics could include food security and nutrition, food safety, worker protections and rights, and the intersection of food law with other issues of social and economic equity, among others. Section sessions for the past several years have addressed aspects of equity in the food system and the 2022 session is intended to continue that.

Submission Information: If you are interested in participating, please send a 400-600-word description of what you’d like to discuss to Marie Boyd, at boydmc@law.sc.edu selected presenters will be notified by mid-July. Speakers are responsible for paying their own registration fees.


Section on Aging and the Law

Co-Sponsored by the Sections on Civil Rights; Clinical; Disability; Family Law; Law, Medicine and Health Care; Poverty Law; and Sexual Orientation, Gender, and Identity.

Program Description: The AALS Section on Aging and the Law will focus its annual meeting program on inequality and aging. The conception of the program is broad and intended to encompass all matters of legal concern that involve age and inequality. Potential topics include but are not limited to aging in the criminal justice system, contact between family and nursing home residents during the COVID-19 pandemic, the disparate impact of policies within the Medicare and Medicaid programs, vaccine distribution policies, the rights and wages of care workers, the impact of technology on access to legal assistance, and economic inequality in later life based on disability, gender, race, sexual orientation, or other characteristics.

Submission Information: If you are interested in participating, please send a 400-600 word description of what you would like to discuss. We particularly encourage submissions from junior scholars and members of underrepresented groups in legal academia. Submissions should be sent to Professor Alexander A. Boni-Saenz, abonisae@kentlaw.iit.edu by July 7, 2021.


Section on Associate Deans for Academic Affairs and Research

Description: Legal education is finally showing signs of adapting to the needs of the modern world, by focusing more on the necessary competencies needed for its graduates and not solely on doctrine. Associate Deans are well-positioned to help lead their schools in the inclusion of these diverse skills into their curricular, co-curricular, and extra-curricular efforts. Schools are adding required and encouraged courses as well as programs focused on the regulatory state, professional identity formation, and diversity and inclusion, among others. Other schools are integrating diversity, equity, inclusion, and professional identity formation into existing required curriculum. Associate Deans will benefit from sharing strategies for successfully reforming curricular offerings and programming to reflect the skills and knowledge that new law graduates need to practice in an informed and competent way. Whether you are an Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Diversity and Inclusion, Research and Scholarship or Experiential Learning, you play a key role in this transition for your school. This program is designed to bring together all associate deans to share ideas and plans to ensure your law school is delivering modern competencies and perspectives in your program of legal education.

Possible topics may include:
•Integrating Diversity and Inclusion into the Curriculum
•Innovative Course Proposals
•Administrative Structure Teamwork and Division of Labor;
•Balancing Faculty Governance with External Stakeholders;
•Encouraging Faculty Scholarship to Adapt to the Moment

Submission Information: If you are interested in participating, please send a brief description(no longer than a page) of what you would like to discuss. We encourage submissions from associate deans at all levels of experience and across all job descriptions. Submissions should be sent to Professor Michael J.Higdon,mhigdon3@utk.edu by July 12th at8p.m. EST


Section on Biolaw

Description: Loyola University Chicago’s nationally acclaimed Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy is pleased to invite original research submissions for the annual Wiet Life Science Law Scholars Workshop to be held on Friday, September 10, 2021. We are currently planning for a hybrid format event this year with both physical attendees at Loyola University Chicago School of Law and a virtual option for those who choose not to travel.
The workshop is designed to provide an intellectual venue for life science professors, scholars, and practitioners to convene and discuss current research and scholarship. The term “life science law” encompasses projects from diverse legal fields where life sciences research and development play a pivotal role, which could include biotechnology, food and drug law, health law, IP, environmental, administrative, privacy, and antitrust law. Our goal is to foster recognition of life science law as a cohesive, dynamic area of legal study and strengthen connections among national life science law scholars. Accordingly, topics without a strong life science connection will not be considered.

Submission Information: The deadline for submission is Friday, June 25. Submit via email to health-law@luc.edu (and cc: jparadise@luc.edu) with the subject line Wiet Life Science Law. Your submission should include not only the 750-1,000 word abstract, but also author contact information, as well as two or three US scholars that you believe would provide insightful feedback and comments on your article. In addition, you must commit to provide a full draft if selected. Selected scholars will be notified by email on or before Friday, July 16. For those selected to participate, the deadline for the full draft (15,000-20,000 words) is Friday, August 27.


Section on Business Associations

Program Description: The AALS Section on Business Associations is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for its program at the 2022 AALS Annual Meeting, which will be held virtually. The topic is Race and Teaching Business Associations. Up to two presenters will be selected for the section’s program.

Business Associations classes taught in most law schools spend little if any time on issues relating to racial discrimination and inequity. But as important social institutions, businesses have long had a significant impact on racial equity. The increasing scrutiny of the lack of diversity on public company boards is one of several fronts where businesses are facing both legal and social pressure to address racial inequity. Students are increasingly interested in understanding how the law governing business organizations reflects or contributes to racial injustice. Many law professors want to do more to cover topics relating to race in their Business Associations course and are seeking guidance on how to do so. This panel will provide a forum where teachers of Business Associations can share ideas for incorporating the subject of racial discrimination and inequity into their classes.

Submission Information: Please submit an abstract or a draft of an unpublished paper to Jim Park, james.park@law.ucla.edu, on or before Friday, August 20, 2021. Authors should include their name and contact information in their submission email but remove all identifying information from their submission. Papers will be selected after review by members of the Executive Committee of the Section. Presenters will be responsible for paying their registration fee, if applicable. We recognize that the past year has been incredibly challenging and that these challenges have not fallen equally across the academy. We encourage scholars to err on the side of submission, including by submitting early-stage or incomplete drafts. Scholars whose papers are selected will have until December to finalize their papers. Please direct any questions to Jim Park, UCLA School of Law, at james.park@law.ucla.edu.


Program Description: The AALS Section on Business Associations is pleased to announce a “New Voices in Business Law” program during the 2022 AALS Annual Meeting, which will be held virtually. This works-in-progress program will bring together junior and senior scholars in the field of business law for the purpose of providing junior scholars with feedback and guidance on their draft articles. To complement its other session at the Meeting, this Section is especially interested in papers relating to race and business law, but it welcomes submissions on all business-related topics.

Submission Information: Junior scholars who are interested in participating in the program should send a draft or summary of at least five pages to Professor Eric Chaffee at Eric.Chaffee@utoledo.edu on or before Friday, August 20, 2021. The cover email should state the junior scholar’s institution, tenure status, number of years in his or her current position, whether the paper has been accepted for publication, and, if not when the scholar anticipates submitting the article to law reviews. The subject line of the email should read: “Submission—Business Associations WIP Program.”

Junior scholars whose papers are selected for the program will need to submit a draft to the senior scholar commentators by Friday, December 10, 2021.

More information on this program can be found here.


Section on Children and the Law

Co-Sponsored by the Sections on Poverty Law and Family and Juvenile Law

Program Description: The AALS Section on Children and the Law invites original submissions for presentation at our session at the above titled 2022 AALS Annual Meeting program co-sponsored with the Section on Poverty Law and the Section on Family & Juvenile Law. The meeting is scheduled to take place from January 5-9, 2022 in an online virtual format. Our session will occur on Saturday, January 8, 2022 from 3:10PM to 4:25PM Eastern Time.

The COVID-19 pandemic is the latest in a long series of catastrophes that have disproportionately impacted the most marginalized among us, exponentially exacerbating existing inequities. What has been laid bare in the course of the pandemic is the precariousness of various systems of care — economic, health, education, political, and justice — and how vulnerable these systems, as well as the people they serve, are under the strain of natural or manmade stressors. Poor communities of color, especially children, are at greatest risk of exposure when the fault lines give way, jeopardizing not only their present well-being, but their ability to secure a hope-filled future. And yet, as unsettling as our current crisis has been, with over half a million deaths in the United States, we are cognizant of the even more dire cascading global threats posed by climate change, for which the COVID-19 pandemic has been but a “fire drill.” The effects of climate change and environmental degradation are already exacting a devastating toll and causing disproportionate harm to children’s health, safety and well-being. There is no doubt that climate change related challenges will increasingly test the resiliency, capacity and adaptability of communities, states, individuals and the systems that serve and protect children. Our ability to respond requires harnessing the knowledge gained from our recent pandemic and exploring new legal models and frameworks to address the bigger challenges ahead. This Section’s program will focus on understanding the lessons from COVID-19 as instructive for addressing the fundamental threat to child well- being caused by climate change. We aim to bring together various voices on child-well being, utilizing an intersectional and interdisciplinary lens to explore the risks that the pandemic has exposed and the myriad of ways in which we are called to respond.

Submission Guidelines: The Section on Children and the Law will select up to three proposals from this call for papers. We welcome submissions at all stages of development from Section members and non-members and strongly encourage submissions from junior and/or diverse scholars who are engaged in related research and writing. Please forward the attached Call for Papers to those who may be interested. Our submission deadline is Tuesday, September 7, 2021. Papers and questions should be submitted to Chair-elect Professor Sacha Coupet at scoupet@luc.edu.


Section on Constitutional Law

Program Description: The Section on Constitutional Law is excited to announce a call for papers from which we will select one additional presenter for the Section’s main program at the 2022 annual meeting, which will be held virtually. This program will provide a forum for criticisms and defenses of originalism, and discussion between panelists.

Submission Guidelines: Papers may be of any length. Please submit your paper to Lee Strang (University of Toledo) at Lee.Strang@utoledo.edu and Andrea Freeman (University of Hawaii) at afree@hawaii.edu. The due date for submissions is August 15, 2021. The Selection Committee will review the papers and notify the author of the selected paper by October 4, 2021. Presenters will be responsible for paying their conference registration fee. We are particularly interested in featuring the work of junior scholars and scholars who will bring diversity to the panel.

Inquiries about this call for papers should be submitted to Lee Strang at Lee.Strang@utoledo.edu and Andrea Freeman at afree@hawaii.edu.


Section on Empirical Study of Legal Education

Co-Sponsored by the Sections on Election Law, Leadership,
Legislation & Law of the Political Process, and Professional Responsibility

Program Description: The Section on the Empirical Study of Legal Education and the Legal Profession is organizing a panel featuring emerging empirical scholarship on the role of lawyers and legal education in sustaining representative democracy. Events during the past year (including some during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting) have highlighted the critical relationship between the legal academy and our systems of political representation. Law school graduates are elected to office in all three branches of government and law faculty are commonly asked to serve in roles in each new Presidential administration. To advance our understanding of the relationship between legal education and representative democracy, we invite proposals articulating emerging empirical
research on:
a. Lawyers in representative government roles;
b. Law school engagement with the electoral process;
c. Navigating classroom conversations on sensitive topics with diverse populations;
d. Social trustee professionalism in law;
e. Internal democratic and shared-governance processes as preparation for wider civil
participation;
f. Curricular and extracurricular initiatives aimed at fostering skills enabling law graduates
to participate in and play leadership roles in the democratic process;
g. Efforts to ensure that a multitude of voices, including those of groups historically
excluded or marginalized and those underrepresented in today’s academy, are represented
and heard on campus; and
h. Other related projects.

As part of this program, we also intend to solicit input from lawyers (particularly those who are
current or former legal educators) with significant electoral or political roles to better understand
how empirical scholarship might inform and affect their work maintaining democratic
institutions

Submission Guidelines: Proposals should contain an explanation of both the substance of the presentation and
the methods used in the underlying research. The planning committee would prefer to highlight
talent across a range of law schools, disciplines, and methodologies and is especially interested
in new and innovative research. Please share this call with colleagues—both within and outside
of the legal academy. Proposals must include the following information:

  • A title for your presentation.
  • A brief (500-word) description of your proposed presentation, including its substantive
    content and the empirical methods utilized in the underlying research.
  • Your current CV.

The Program Committee especially welcomes submissions from women, caregivers, people of
color, junior scholars, those in the LGBTQIA+ community, first generation scholars, ESL
faculty, immigrants, untenured scholars, and those whose work has been disproportionately
affected by public health and working conditions in the last year.

Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis, so please send yours as soon as possible, but
no later than Sunday, August 1, 2021 to Trent Kennedy. If you have any questions, please
email trent.kennedy@georgetown.edu.

More information can be found here.


Section on European Law

Program Description: The AALS Section on European Law, with the co-sponsorship of the Section on International Law, invites submissions for its session at the 2022 AALS Annual Meeting. Next year’s annual meeting will be held virtually from January 5-9, 2022, with the Section on European Law panel scheduled for Thursday, January 6, from 11:00-12:15 (EST). We welcome submissions at any stage of development on the following topic: The Future of the EU: Brexit, Covid-19, and the Rise of Inequalities The European Union is at a crossroads. European institutions are confronting both old and new challenges. But opportunities also arise when challenges are faced. The Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated the slow recovery from the 2009 financial crisis and the subsequent sovereign debt crises faced by many member states. Brexit and its finalization on 31 January 2020 have left a sour relationship and several unresolved disputes between the institutions and their former member state. To confront the new borderless climate risk demands a unified approach. These are only some of the issues the EU is facing, but these problems are also “seeds of opportunity” for the European project. The ‘Next Generation EU’ recovery plan and the EU joint financial response to the Covid-19 crisis was labelled by some commentators as the “European Hamiltonian Moment.” The European Green Deal is leading the global dialogue on climate reforms and the European Central Bank is one of the major interlocutors in the green finance space. This panel offers a forum for discussion and debate on the future of the EU, the challenges it faces, and the opportunities ahead—and is open to any area or submission, including any not mentioned above, touching on European law.

Submission Guidelines: Please email your submission to the Section Chair, Paolo Saguato, psaguato@gmu.edu on or
before August 20, 2021. Please also indicate (a) whether you are tenured, pre-tenure, or other; (b) how far along the full article is, and (c) optionally, any other information that might benefit the committee in selecting a diverse panel of speakers. The submission can be an abstract, a paper proposal, the introduction from a longer paper, or a fully developed project. Up to four papers will be selected from the submissions for presentation in January. In the subject line please write: “Submission for AALS European Law Section Main Panel 2022.” The authors of the accepted papers will be notified by September 20, 2021.

More information can be found here.

Program Description: The AALS Section on European Law is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for its “Emerging and New Voices in European Law” work-in-progress workshop. The session will be held virtually on Friday, January 7 from 4:45-6:00 p.m. (EST). The workshop will bring together up to four junior scholars and senior European law scholars for the purpose of giving junior scholars constructive feedback on their scholarship and helping them prepare their work for submission for publication. Format: Each junior scholar will be paired with at least one senior scholar who will comment on the paper presented. Junior scholars’ presentations will be followed by oral comments from senior scholars and further discussion, as time permits. The senior commentators will be prepared to offer constructive comments at the session, and they are strongly encouraged to provide them also in writing to the junior scholar.

Submission Guidelines: Junior scholars who are interested in participating in the program should send an abstract (or longer summary) or draft-in-progress to the Chair of the Section on European Law, Paolo Saguato, at psaguato@gmu.edu, on or before September 1, 2021. The cover email should state the junior scholar’s institution, academic status, number of years in her or his current position, and any previous positions in academia. Submitted papers must be “in progress” as of the time of the Annual Meeting in January 2022 (a paper accepted for publication but still undergoing revision is considered “in progress”). The subject line of the email should read: “Submission—EU WIP Program 2022.” Junior scholars whose papers are selected for the program will need to submit their draft paper to the Section Chair by December 12, 2021, in order that the assigned commenters will have sufficient time to read the drafts prior to the Annual Meeting. The authors of the accepted papers will be notified by September 20, 2021.

More information can be found here.


Section on Family and Juvenile Law

Co-Sponsored by the Section on Teaching Methods

Program Description: The Section on Family & Juvenile Law is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for its Pedagogy Penal on Centering Race and Class In Family Law Teaching. The Pedagogy Panel is co-sponsored by the Section on Teaching Methods. The Pedagogy Panel will be held during the AALS Annual Meeting in early January 2022 in New York City. The goal of the session is to discuss and share various approaches to integrating issues of race and class into what we teach, how we teach, and how we assess in the family and juvenile law curriculum. Race and class are intertwined in many distinct areas of family law, and we welcome any paper that explores this intersection. Presentations that solely address race or class are also welcome, as the two subject matters may not be conflated.

Submission Guidelines: Participants are encouraged to demonstrate, model, and discuss their holistic inclusive approaches to the courses as well as to provide examples of how they handle discrete cases or topics. Presenters will be expected to share relevant and replicable materials in advance of the Annual Meeting. If you are interested in participating, please send a 400-600 word description of what you’d like to discuss.Submissions should be sent to Professor Naomi Cahn, ncahn@law.virginia.edu. The due date for submissions is June 22, 2021, and decisions will be made by the Pedagogy subcommittee, which also includes Jamie Abrams (Louisville), Jeffrey Dodge (Penn State Dickinson Law), Hannah Haksgaard (South Dakota) , and Jessica Dixon Weaver(SMU). We will notify the selected presenters by mid-July, 2021. In addition, the Family Law Quarterly is dedicating its Spring 2022 volume to race and family law, and there is the possibility of publication with the journal. Jessica Dixon Weaver (SMU) will be editing the volume. Please let us know if you are interested in that option on your submission. Article length is expected to be approximately 11,000 words.


Section on Financial Institutions and Consumer Financial Services

Program Description: The AALS Section on Financial Institutions and Consumer Financial Services invites submissions of no more than five pages for its session at the 2022 annual meeting of the AALS. Next year’s annual meeting will be held virtually from January 5-9, 2022, with the date and time of the Section’s session yet to be announced. The submission can be the abstract and/or introduction from a longer paper, and it should relate to the following session description:

Climate Finance and Banking Regulation: Beyond Disclosure?
In the United States, banking regulation has been slower than other forms of financial regulation (and slower than its European counterparts) to address climate-related financial risks. This panel explores the proper role of banking regulation in addressing the physical and transition risks from climate change. Possible measures include: standardized, mandatory climate risk disclosures by banks; supervisory assessments of climate-related financial risk; capital and liquidity regulation; climate risk scenario tests; determination of the appropriate role of banks in mitigating climate risk; financial stability oversight of climate risk; and action (through the Community Reinvestment Act and otherwise) to deter harms to disadvantaged communities and communities of color from climate change.

Submission Guidelines: Please email your anonymized materials by Friday, July 16, 2021, to Joe Graham, jgraham@bu.edu. Please also indicate, in addition to the proposal submission of up to five pages: (a) whether you are tenured, pre-tenure, or other; (b) whether you are in your first five years as a law professor (including any years spent as a fellow or visiting assistant professor); (c) how far along the full article is and when you expect to complete the discussion draft; and (d) optionally, how you would contribute to diverse perspectives in our field or on the panel.

The Section will announce the author(s) selected to present by no later than early September, 2021.


Section on Internet and Computer Law

Program Description: The section’s program is titled *Algorithms in the Academy: Surveillance, Evaluation, and Risk Assessment at Universities*, and will be held virtually at 11:00 AM on Sunday, January 9, 2022. On campus, automated systems are increasingly becoming part of a new normal. Indeed, as faculty, staff, and students return from a year away from campus, they might come back to find that robots seem to have taken over. University systems track our health on a daily basis, granting and denying permission to attend class. Test administration software tracks eye movements and internet glitches, claiming to be able to detect cheating. In extreme cases, testing providers have skipped the tests altogether, using other student data to assign individual scores. And these are only some of the new examples of algorithms in the academy. Which systems will persist? Which ones should we discard? Which ones have we overlooked? What values are served or lost by employing these automated, algorithmic systems? In this program, we’ll discuss new scholarship and the emerging controversies that attend to the use of such automated systems on campus.

Submission Guidelines: Your submission may be an abstract or an article draft. Submissions should be sent to Tejas Narechania, Section Chair, at tnarecha@law.berkeley.edu. The deadline for submissions is August 31, 2021. Panelists will be selected after review by the Section’s Executive Committee. Selected author(s) will be notified no later than September 22, 2021.

Unfortunately, we cannot cover travel expenses for this virtual conference.


Section on Law and Mental Disability

Co-Sponsored by the Sections on Law, Medicine, and Healthcare, and Disability Law

Program Description: The Section on Law and Mental Disability of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS) will devote its annual meeting program to examining the nexus between healthcare decision-making and mental health/illness. The Section invites scholars to submit proposals for presentations that explore how the law can facilitate, undermine, or otherwise shape individuals’ choices with regard to mental healthcare. The Section also invites proposals for presentations that will explore healthcare decision-making by and for individuals with mental illness or mental disability. The Section will give priority to proposals that address timely issues, innovative approaches, or comparative perspectives. Submissions from junior scholars and members of groups that are under-represented in legal academia are encouraged. The program will be part of the AALS annual meeting, which will be held virtually from January 5-9, 2022.

Submission Guidelines: Individuals interested in participating in the Section’s program should send a 200-500 word abstract of their proposed presentation to Professor Nina Kohn at nakohn@syr.edu no later than August 1, 2021 (earlier submissions welcomed enthusiastically). If the proposed presentation is based on an existing work, or work-in-progress, a copy of that work or work-in-progress may be submitted in addition to an abstract.


Sections on Law and the Social Sciences and on Law and the Humanities

Co-Sponsored by the Sections on Empirical Study of Legal Education and the Legal Profession, Indian Nations and Indigenous Peoples, Legal History, and Minority Groups

Program Description: The Sections on Law and the Social Sciences and on Law and the Humanities are pleased to announce our joint program to be held during the AALS Annual 2022 Annual Meeting. The program is titled “Creating Inclusive Cross-Disciplinary Research to Advance the Common Good.” The program will proceed in the format of two panels, spanning a total of three hours. The Law and the Social Sciences Section is organizing one panel, “Ethics and Inclusion in Social Science Research Bearing on the Law.” The Law and the Humanities Section is organizing the other panel, “Humanities Research Shaping the Law.” This call for presentations is for the “Ethics and Inclusion in Social Science Research Bearing on the Law” panel. This panel will explore ethics and inclusion within social science research from the vantage points of research areas and subjects, as well as the researchers themselves. The panel will focus on the intersection of social science research and the law, while integrating research from social scientists not framed expressly around law, thereby examining broadly whose voices, thoughts, and insights are included in the social scientific endeavor. Panelists will come from legal and social science backgrounds. They will discuss, among other topics, teaching research ethics with marginalized communities, the language used to refer to various groups, the inclusion of people from communities of color as research subjects, and the inclusion and amplifying of researchers from diverse demographic and methodological backgrounds.

Submission Guidelines: We invite submissions from scholars interested in presenting as part of this panel. Please see the panel description above for the parameters of the panel. One or two speakers will be selected from this call for presentations. There is no formal requirement as to the format of presentations. For instance, you may submit a proposal to present an ongoing research project, a paper in progress, or a recently completed paper. Depending on the number of panelists, each panelist should be allocated about 15 to 20 minutes to present. Untenured scholars, women scholars, scholars of color, LGBTQ scholars, and other traditionally underrepresented populations in particular are encouraged to submit their work.

To submit, please send a presentation proposal of no more than two pages to the chair of the Law and the Social Sciences Section, Pamela Foohey, at pamela.foohey@yu.edu, by Friday, June 24, 2021. If you have questions about this call for presentations, please email Pamela Foohey.


Section on Leadership

Program Description: The Section on Leadership is pleased to announce a Call for Papers from which one additional presenter will be selected for the Section’s program to be held during the AALS 2022 Annual Meeting in Washing DC, in January of 2022. The Annual Meeting will be conducted through distance technology rather than in person. American Law Schools are increasingly offering their students opportunities to develop the leadership skills, behaviors and attitudes that will advance their abilities as future leaders in the legal profession, government and politics. Their leadership will be important as legal education addresses contemporary issues of racism, discrimination and bias in our society and in legal education. The 2022 Section on Leadership’s program will feature conversations with lawyers who serve in a variety of these roles with the selected topic of: Leadership and Equity: The Promise of Leadership Education in Advancing Anti-Racist Reform in Legal Education.

Submission Guidelines: The article should be no more than 15,000 words, including footnotes and should be submitted anonymously. A cover letter with the author’s name and contact information should accompany the paper. Papers and cover letters should be submitted electronically to Donald Polden at dpolden@scu.edu. The due date for submission is September 1, 2021. The author of the selected paper will be notified by September 30, 2021, and given information about the Section program at the Annual Meeting.

Any questions about the Call for Paper or the Section process of selection should be submitted to Donald J. Polden at dpolden@scu.edu or calling 408 210 5303.


Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research

Co-Sponsored by the Section on Professional Responsibility

Program Description: The Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research seeks proposals for a program during the AALS Annual Meeting scheduled for January 5–9, 2022. The meeting will be held virtually. In connection with the theme of the Annual Meeting— Freedom, Equality, and the Common Good—the LWRR Program Committee seeks presenters for a program titled Pursuing the Common Good in Fractured Communities: Rethinking Legal Practice and Pedagogy. This session will be co-sponsored by the AALS Section on Professional Responsibility. Proposals should address concepts surrounding the common good and what inequities the pandemic has revealed about legal education and lawyering. The Committee wishes to recognize that we are still in the midst of a very particular moment and wants to host a main program that will offer presenters and attendees an opportunity to discuss some of the difficult questions that the pandemic has brought to the fore. Such topics may include professional identity (defined broadly, including the ABA’s proposed curricular requirement as well as concerns about status and equity within the legal academy laid bare by the pandemic), the responsibility to engage in difficult conversations in the classroom and beyond, teaching through crisis or trauma, and training lawyers to be ethical practitioners and leaders. The program has been allotted one hour and forty-five minutes.

Submission Guidelines: The Committee welcomes submissions from pre-assembled panels that propose to fill the entire one hour and forty-five minutes as well as submissions from presenters who propose to use only a portion of that time. The Committee encourages participation by faculty of different experience levels and who teach within different disciplines. Additionally, the Committee will give preference to presentations with an interactive component—such as breaking into small discussion groups or presenters leading a discussion with the audience. Alternative formats may also be considered, such as a panel of presentations with Q and A following. Selected presenters will work closely with a moderator to prepare the program to ensure cohesion among presenters.

Proposals should contain the following information:

  • The name, contact, and biographical information for each proposed presenter, including designation of the primary contact person;
  • A proposed title for your presentation;
  • A detailed description of your presentation, including content and format and how much time you think you will need; and
  • A brief bibliography of materials relevant to your program topic.

The deadline for proposals is 11:59 p.m. on May 26, 2021. Submit your proposal to Abby Patthoff, patthoff@chapman.edu. Include “AALS LWRR Proposal” in your subject line. Please do not submit a PDF.


Section on Property Law

Program Description: The Section on Property Law is pleased to announce a Call for Papers from which three junior faculty members will be selected to present at the Section’s “New Voices in Property Law: Junior Scholars Works-in-Progress Panel” to be held on Saturday, January 8th at 4:45 – 6:00 pm ET, during the AALS 2022 Annual Meeting, which will be held virtually. In the past we have had more than three presentations, but the AALS is limiting us this year to three presenters and three respondents. The purpose of this works-in-progress program is to bring together junior (pre-tenure or teaching for seven or fewer years) and senior property law scholars to give the junior scholars an opportunity to present and get useful feedback on papers that will not yet have been submitted for publication as of January 2022. (Posting the draft paper on SSRN or the like is fine.)In addition to having the opportunity to share work through the panel, at least one senior scholar will be designated as a reviewer who will have read the paper ahead of time and will be prepared to discuss the paper and offer constructive comments at the session and/or in writing.

Submission Guidelines: Please submit a 300 – 400 word abstract in Word to the Professor Shelley Cavalieri at shelley.cavalieri@utoledo.edu with “Submission: Property New Voices” in the subject line. Submissions must be received by September 1, 2020. The AALS Annual Meeting will be entirely virtual in 2022. Call for Papers presenters will be responsible for paying registering for the meeting, but the AALS is offering school-wide registration. Papers will be selected after review by members of the Executive Committee of the Property Section.

For senior scholars interested in serving as commentators: If you are interested in serving as a commentator on a paper submitted by a junior scholar, please email Shelley Cavalieri at shelley.cavalieri@utoledo.edu
Questions: Please direct inquiries to Shelley Cavalieri at the email above or to the Property Section chair, John Infranca, jinfranca@suffolk.edu.


Program Description: The AALS Section on Property Law is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for a special session on pedagogy at the 2022 Annual Meeting, “Stuff You’ll Want to Steal: Ideas for Teaching about Race, Class and Indigenous Peoples in Property Law.” The 2022 meeting will be virtual and the Property Section’s pedagogy session will be held at 4:45 – 6 pm (ET) on Friday, January 7th. The program description is below. Great teachers are always looking for new ideas, assignments, and materials to incorporate into their courses. The AALS Property Law Section will be holding a panel showcasing some of the best specific ideas for first year property law—ideas you can steal—for teaching about race, class, and indigenous peoples. Each panel participant will demonstrate one technique, assignment, or lesson that engages students and communicates an essential concept. This panel will share concrete ideas for impactful teaching about the multiplicity of ways that property law intersects with race, class, and indigenous peoples.

Submission Guidelines: Submissions should be of brief presentation summaries (between 250 and 500 words) of a technique, assignment, or materials that you use when teaching first year property. Tell us about your best finds and inventions for teaching about race, class, and indigenous peoples in ways that are impactful for your students. We want to hear about your ideas—specific and implementable—that you can present in about ten minutes at AALS. Share with us the things we will all want to add to a syllabus. Each potential speaker may submit only one presentation summary for consideration. Abstracts must be submitted by Tuesday, August 31, 2021. Abstracts should be submitted electronically in Microsoft Word format to Jill Fraley at fraleyj@wlu.edu. The subject line should read “AALS Property Section Pedagogy Submission.”

Submissions will be reviewed by members of the Section’s Executive Committee. Selected presenters will be announced by no later than September 24, 2021. By submitting an abstract for consideration, you agree to attend the 2022 AALS Annual Meeting Property Law Session should your idea be selected for presentation. Presenters will be responsible for paying their own registration fee. AALS will be offering school-wide registration again this year. Any inquiries about the Call should be directed to Jill Fraley at the contact information noted above.


Program Description: The AALS Section on Property Law is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for our main program at the 2022 Annual Meeting, “Regulatory Takings at 100,” which is cosponsored by the Section on State and Local Government Law. The 2022 meeting will be virtual and our main session will be held on Friday, January 7, 2022 at 11 am – 12:15 pm ET. The program description is below. 2022 is the 100 year anniversary of PA Coal v. Mahon and the dawn of regulatory takings doctrine. The AALS Property Law Section will be holding a panel discussing the current status of regulatory takings doctrine. Panel participants will consider developments including the abandonment of the requirement that plaintiffs exhaust their remedies in state court, the scope of the per se physical takings doctrine, the relationship between transferable development rights programs and regulatory takings, and takings challenges to state and local sustainability measures and environmental regulation.

Submission Guidelines: Submissions should be of abstracts between 250 and 500 words. Scholarship may be at any stage of the publication process from work-in-progress to completed article, but if already completed, scholarship may not be published prior to the Annual Meeting. We welcome legal scholarship across a wide variety of methodological approaches and encourage untenured scholars in particular to submit their work. Each potential speaker may submit only one abstract for consideration. Abstracts must be submitted by Tuesday, August 31, 2021. Abstracts should be submitted electronically in Microsoft Word format to John Infranca at jinfranca@suffolk.edu. The subject line should read “AALS Property Section CFP Submission.”

Abstracts and papers will be reviewed by members of the Section’s Executive Committee. Selected presenters will be announced by no later than September 24, 2021. By submitting an abstract for consideration, you agree to attend the 2022 AALS Annual Meeting Property Law Session should your paper be selected for presentation. Presenters will be responsible for paying their own registration fee. AALS will be offering school-wide registration again this year. Any inquiries about the Call for Papers should be directed to John Infranca at the contact information noted above.


Section on Securities Regulation

Program Description: The AALS Section on Securities Regulation invites submissions from junior scholars (defined as those who have been in a tenure-track position for 7 or fewer years) for its Emerging Voices session at the 2022 AALS annual meeting. The session will be held virtually on Saturday, January 8 from 4:45-6:00 p.m. (EST). The session brings together junior and senior securities regulation scholars for the purpose of providing junior scholars feedback on their scholarship and helping them prepare their work for submission for publication. Junior scholars’ presentations of their drafts will be followed by comments from senior scholars and further audience discussion.

Submission Guidelines: If you would like to present your draft as a junior scholar, by August 20, 2021, please send your draft toProfessor Jeremy McClane at jmcclane@illinois.edu. submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed. We welcome papers over abstracts and paper proposals. The authors of the selected papers will be notified by mid-September 2021. If you would like to volunteer to provide feedback as a more senior scholar, please let Professor McClane know, at jmcclane@illinois.edu, by August 20, 2021. Thank you in advance for your generosity.


Section on Taxation

Program Description: The AALS Section on Taxation is pleased to announce the following Call for Papers. Selected papers will be presented at a works-in-progress session at the 2022 AALS Annual Meeting from January 5 through 9. This program will provide panelists the opportunity to present their work and receive feedback from senior colleagues in the field. Note: The 2022 AALS Annual Meeting will be fully virtual.

Submission Guidelines: Papers should be submitted electronically as Microsoft Word documents to Professor Kathleen Thomas at kdthomas@unc.edu by 5 p.m. PDT on Friday, August 13, 2021. The subject line should read “AALS Tax Section CFP Submission.” The cover email should state the author’s institution, number of years of full-time teaching experience, whether the paper has been submitted for publication consideration, and whether the paper has been accepted for publication.

More information on submission guidelines can be found here.


Section on Trusts and Estates

Program Description: Trusts and Estates continues to serve as a reflection of societal values and inequalities as we transfer our belongings at death to the next generation. We invite papers that explore how gender, race, class, sexual orientation, age, immigration, or disability shape succession law, how inheritance and wealth inequality are impacted by our testamentary system, the challenges of estate planning for underserved communities, how charitable giving plays out in today’s dispositions, and how the Covid-19 pandemic has contributed to or disrupted inequalities in succession law. This panel will discuss Trusts and Estates in light of these and related societal developments as well as pedagogical tools to bring these topics into the classroom. Full-time faculty of AALS member schools or non-member fee-paid schools as of the submission deadline are eligible to submit papers. For co-authored papers, both authors must satisfy the eligibility criteria.

Submission Guidelines: Submissions should be of abstracts between 250 and 1,000 words, inclusive of any footnotes. Scholarship may be at any stage of the publication process from work-in- progress to completed article, but if already published, scholarship may not be published any earlier than 2020. We welcome legal scholarship across a wide variety of methodological approaches. Each potential speaker may submit only one abstract for consideration.

There are two submission due dates. The Section seeks detailed abstracts in late summer, with final papers due in late fall.

  • The due date for detailed abstracts is August 31, 2020.
  • The due date for final papers is November 15, 2020.

Abstracts and papers should be submitted electronically in Microsoft Word format to Natalie Lynner at natalie.lynner@drake.edu. The subject line should read “AALS Trusts & Estates Section CFP Submission.” By submitting an abstract for consideration, you agree to attend the 2022 AALS Annual Meeting Trusts & Estates Program Session should your paper be selected for presentation. Submission review, selection, conference attendance: Abstracts and papers will be reviewed by members of the Section’s Executive Committee. Selected presenters will be announced by September 24, 2021. The Call for Paper presenters will be responsible for paying their own AALS registration fee, hotel, and travel expenses. Inquiries or questions: Any inquiries about the Call for Papers should be directed to Natalie Lynner at the contact information noted below.


Section on Women in Legal Education

Program Description: The Section on Women in Legal Education is pleased to announce a Call for Papers from which presenters will be selected to participate in the Section’s main program at the AALS 2022 Annual Meeting in New York, NY. The program, titled “Other Voices in Feminist Legal Theory,” will discuss views from scholars whose work marks them as feminist legal theorists even if they have not traditionally been labeled as such.

Submission Guidelines: We welcome proposals for 15-20-minute presentations on these topics. Proposals for presentations should be sent as an e-mail file attachment in MS Word to Lolita Buckner Inniss, linniss@colorado.edu with the heading “WILE OTHER VOICES SUBMISSION”. Proposals for presentations should be 500-1000 words long, should clearly state the topic to be addressed, any special technological needs for the session, along with the presenter’s background, years of teaching, institutional affiliation, and contact information. All abstracts will be reviewed by members of the WILE Program Committee. Selected professors will present their work at the January 2022 AALS Annual Meeting. The due date for submissions is June 18, 2021.

More information can be found here.